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Monday, 4 February 2019

Cheesy Corned Beef Cutlets



Recently, I had made Cheesy Corned Beef Jaffles/Toasties (recipe is on the blog and at a few food groups on Facebook that are very close to my heart). I had some Corned Beef Mix left over and decided to turn that into cutlets. For that reason, the basic recipe (with a few added ingredients) and the Corned Beef Mix photographs on the blog remain the same. The process of making the kebabs, though, are new clicks. I hope you guys enjoy the kebabs as much as mum and dad did. 😊


Ingredients:

1 tin Corned Beef (425 grams)
1 large onion, finely chopped
5 to 6 green chilies, slit and finely chopped
75 to 100 grams block of Britannia cheese, diced into tiny pieces
1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
Breadcrumbs
2 to 3 eggs, beaten (seasoning – optional)
Oil to shallow fry

Method:

  1. Empty out the corned beef in a large vessel and mash it up with a fork. Ensure there are no lumps.


  2. Add the chopped onions, green chilies, black pepper powder, cheese dices and mix well.


  3. Check for seasoning and add extra black pepper powder if you want an extra zing.


  4. Make a cutlet two inches in diameter, gently and carefully coat in finely ground breadcrumbs and keep aside on a platter. Repeat until all the Corned Beef Mix is used up.


  5. Heat oil in a non-stick frying pan.
  6. Take a breaded cutlet and gently and lightly dip it in the egg wash (beaten eggs) and once again carefully coat the cutlet, a second time, in the breadcrumbs.




  7. Gently place the cutlet in the oil.


  8. Repeat the egg wash and double-breadcrumb coating with each cutlet. Fry them in batches, till golden brown. Drain on kitchen paper.


  9. Serve with green chutney or ketchup as a side, or with drinks as finger food.

Chef’s Notes: 
  1. I always use one egg at a time and the same goes for breadcrumbs; I empty out the breadcrumbs as needed. It’s the best way to avoid food wastage.
  2. Do not flip the cutlets too often when frying. Ideally, fry the cutlets on one side to a perfect golden brown and then flip to fry the other side. This helps to keep the cutlets intact.
  3. The tinned Corned Beef mix will not require any salt as it already contains salt (and cheese). You may add a wee bit of seasoning to the beaten eggs.
  4. Do not deep fry these babies; they will crumble.
  5. You may share the direct blog-link of the recipe/s but do NOT publish my recipes and my photographs on any blog-site or website without my explicit consent or attempt to pass off my recipe/s as your own. You will be held accountable for plagiarism.

    Some more photographs...









Wednesday, 30 January 2019

Cheesy Corned Beef Jaffles/Toasties




 I’d been searching for Corned Beef tins for ever so long. I finally found them in Goa. Now that I had the tins in hand, I was wondering what to make when I saw the Jaffle machine in the cabinet. Jaffles/Toasties and piping hot soup for dinner, on a wintry night; dinner sorted, eh? 😉


Ingredients:

1 tin Corned Beef (425 grams)
1 large onion, finely chopped
5 to 6 green chilies, slit and finely chopped
75 to 100 grams block of Britannia cheese, diced into tiny pieces
1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
Bread slices
Butter

Method:
  1. Empty out the corned beef in a large vessel and mash it up with a fork. Ensure there are no lumps.


  2. Add the chopped onions, green chilies, black pepper powder, cheese dices and mix well.


  3. Check for seasoning and add extra black pepper powder if you want an extra zing.


  4. Take a slice of bread, apply a good amount (but not excess or it will ooze out) of the Corned Beef mix on the slice. Cover that with another slice of bread. Keep aside. Repeat with remaining bread slices until all the Corned Beef mix is used up. 
  5. Heat the Jaffle machine as directed on the box. 
  6. When the Jaffle machine indicates it is ready for use, apply butter on the outer sides of the sandwich; this is to ensure the bread does not stick to the Jaffle machine. Gently lay the sandwich into the first slot of the Jaffle machine. Repeat, for the second sandwich slot. 
  7. Close the Jaffle machine and grill till machine pings, or changes light indicator colour, to let you know the Jaffles are ready. 
  8. Repeat the process with each sandwich until all the Jaffles are done.


  9. Serve piping hot with ketchup or a bowl of hot soup.
Chef’s Notes: 
  1. I had used way more cheese, but I wish I hadn’t because it oozed out a hellava lot and cleaning the Jaffle machine took way longer than it took for me to make the Jaffles. *very sheepish look*


  2. The tinned Corned Beef mix will not require any salt as it already contains salt (and cheese).
  3. Instead of grating the cheese, I chose to cut tiny dices of the cheese as that gave off intermittent bursts of cheese. Grated cheese would give one monotonous flavour through every bite.


  4. Do apply butter to the bread slices from the outer side as not only will that prevent the sandwich from sticking, it will also give the sandwich a gorgeous golden glow. And of course, it goes without saying, just like bacon, butter makes everything better. 😉
  5. If you prefer a deep golden-brown colour, grill them a little longer, even after the ‘done’ light goes on.
  6. If you have a large family and are making lots of Jaffles, do keep serving them to the family as you make them to ensure the Jaffles are served piping hot. Warm or cold Jaffles are no fun, more so if they have cheese in them. Bleh!
  7. You may share the direct blog-link of the recipe/s but do NOT publish my recipes and my photographs on any blog-site or website without my explicit consent or attempt to pass off my recipe/s as your own. You will be held accountable for plagiarism.

    A few extra photographs..









Tuesday, 22 January 2019

Parsi Kolmi no Patio (Prawn Patio)



Kolmi no Patio is a dish usually eaten with Mora Dal Chawal (Dhan-Dar-Patio), in most Parsi households. It’s a very simple dal, quite similar to the Maharashtrian Varan-bhaat. The Patio, though, adds immense ‘oomph’ to the humble but delicious dar/dal. We Parsi’s usually cook Patio for lunch on auspicious occasions like birthdays, navjotes, etc.


Ingredients:

30 medium sized prawns, de-veined and washed
5 to 6 large onions, finely chopped
4-5 green chilies, finely chopped
1 teaspoon jeera-cumin seeds
7-8 large tomatoes, halve-grate-discard skin or puree (I grated them)
1 teaspoon + 4 teaspoons red Deghi Mirch powder (I use MDH brand)
¼ teaspoon + ¾ teaspoon turmeric powder
1 heaped teaspoon coriander/cumin powder
½ teaspoon garam masala powder
2 heaped teaspoons Parsi Sambhar masala
1 teaspoon Dhanshak Masala
½ teaspoon black pepper powder
2 tablespoons ginger-garlic paste
½ teaspoon + Salt to taste
6 to 8 tablespoons oil (I’m never stingy with oil😜)
Sugar to taste
Malt Vinegar, to taste (add only if necessary - if the tomatoes aren’t tangy enough - I use Kolah’s Malt Vinegar)
A handful of coriander leaves, chopped fine

Method:

  1. Marinate the prawns with ½ teaspoon salt, ¼ teaspoon turmeric powder and 1 teaspoon red chili powder. Keep aside for 30 minutes.



  2. Heat oil and splutter jeera. Add onions and green chilies. Fry till onions are golden brown.



  3. Add the ginger-garlic paste and fry a bit. Add chili powder, turmeric powder, coriander/cumin powder, garam masala powder, Parsi sambhar masala, black pepper powder and Dhanshak masala. Sauté for a few seconds; do not allow the dry spices to burn. Add extra oil or a splash of water if the masala is too dry and begins to burn. (I add oil)



  4. Add the grated (or pureed) tomatoes and cook till the raw smell of the tomatoes is no longer evident and the oil separates.



  5. Add the chopped coriander leaves; save a few for garnish.



  6. Add prawns.



  7. When the prawns are nearly done, check the gravy for seasoning. 
  8. Add sugar to taste. If the tomatoes haven’t lent enough tartness, add a wee bit of malt vinegar. (Important: The taste of the patio should be such that the wee bit of tartness and sweetness hits your palate as soon as you take a bite and the spiciness hits your palate a few seconds later and lingers on.)
  9. Once you achieve the balance of flavours suited to your palate, take the vessel off the stove.
  10. Garnish with a few coriander leaves and serve.


Chef’s Notes:

  1. A variation that can be used for this dish: instead of chopping the onions you can grind them to a paste and then fry them.
  2. Feel free to use this same recipe for fish patio.
  3. Dhanshak masala and Parsi Sambhar masala do lend a Parsi touch/flavour to the dish but if not available, feel free to make the patio without these ingredients.
  4. If you do not have malt vinegar in your pantry, feel free to use brown or white vinegar; either will work just as well to achieve tartness; what will be lacking, though, is the heady whiff of malt vinegar.
  5. While this dish is usually served with Dhan-Dar, there are times when we merely eat it plain, with Brun pau.
  6. You may share the direct blog-link of the recipe/s but do NOT publish my recipes and my photographs on any blog-site or website without my explicit consent or attempt to pass off my recipe/s as your own. You will be held accountable for plagiarism.