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Monday, 3 August 2020

Green Chutney – The Versatile Coconut-Cilantro-Mint Combination!



Yes, occasionally, I go back to posting basic recipes for people who are newbies in the kitchen. This is one such recipe. This green chutney works beautifully for sandwiches, for Parsi delicacies like Patra ni Machhi and Patra ni Kolmi and yes, you can also use it as a marinade-gravy base for meats. I usually make a 2-bottle batch and use it as and when I need it. It keeps beautifully in the fridge for a week to ten days and because of the added acidity, the colour remains a beautiful green. Go on, give it a try. 😊

Ingredients:

1 whole (medium-sized) fresh coconut, break, remove from shell and cut into slivers
1 cup (tightly filled) coriander leaves, washed
1 cup (tightly filled) mint leaves, washed
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
15 - 18 large cloves of garlic, peeled and washed (increase the quantity if the garlic cloves are small)
12 to 14 green chilies, break into 1-inch pieces
Juice of 2 to 3 limes, to taste
Salt, to taste
Sugar, to taste


Method:

1.    Combine coconut sliver, coriander leaves, mint leaves, green chilies, garlic cloves and cumin seeds, juice of 1 or 1½ limes (only), salt and sugar in a grinder. Add quarter cup water and give it a good whiz. Grind the chutney to a smooth thick consistency.



2.    Open the grinder to check the consistency of the chutney, add more water only if needed and give it yet another whiz.
3.    Check seasoning and acidity levels and adjust lime juice, salt, and sugar as/if needed. If added, give the chutney one more whiz to ensure the added ingredients are well incorporated into the chutney.
4.    Remove the chutney into clean, sterilized, airtight bottles or any airtight fridge container.



5.    Allow the chutney to cool to room temperature; do not put it in the fridge until cool.


Chef Notes:

1.    The quantity of lime juice, salt and sugar depends entirely on your palate. I do suggest you add these three ingredients a little at a time and keeping adding more, as needed. The thing to always remember when cooking anything is, you can always add more as needed, but once added, reducing the excess is difficult and, in some instances, impossible.
2.    I used 12 to 14 medium sized dark green chilies, the ones that are quite high on the heat quotient. If you choose to use the long, light green, not-so-spicy variety, please adjust the quantity according. Here too, the same rule applies. Add fewer chilies if you are unsure, taste as you grind, add more as/if needed and give the chutney a good whiz.
3.    When raw mangoes are in season feel free to substitute them in place of lime juice.
4.    There’s one more use for this versatile baby (read: chutney). Whisk in some smoothened yogurt to a bowlful of this chutney as serve it as a dip with tandoori chicken and tikkas. Oh yeah, it works!
5.    You may share the direct blog-link of the recipe/s but do NOT publish my recipes, and/or my photographs, on any blogsite or website without my explicit consent or attempt to pass off my recipe/s as your own. You will be held accountable for plagiarism.

Some more photographs: 



Thursday, 23 July 2020

Kheema Patties – Not A Patties More Not A Patties Less – The Kheema Chronicles – 3


This is third part of the ‘Kheema Chronicles’. I’m guessing, by now, you all get the point that we Parsi’s don’t say Qeema or Keema, we call it… “Kheema or Kheemo”. That’s right, now you get it! *cheeky grin*

I cooked Kheema three ways. The first recipe was Kheema Fry. I then took the Kheema Fry recipe a tad further to make Khatto Mittho Tikho Sali Kheemo; a typical Parsi recipe.

This is the third recipe that emerged from the previous two that I posted. You can cook these patties with leftover Kheema Fry or Khatto Mittho Tikho Kheemo. We Parsi’s prefer these babies (read: patties) with Khatto Mittho Tikho Kheemo.

Opt for either of the two varieties of kheema but the important thing to keep in mind is… the kheema needs to be the well-sautéed, well-fried kind. Moist kheema will result in shattered patties, when fried.

The process photographs, at my blog, for all three recipes (base recipe), will be similar. There will be many extra process photographs and videos, though, for this recipe.

Instead of using leftover kheema, if you are cooking this recipe from scratch, to simplify the process, I have edited the quantity of ingredients and adjusted the proportions, wherein this recipe will give you a dozen (12) medium sized patties.

Ingredients for Kheema:

250 grams lamb kheema (goat or beef mince will also work)
1 large onion, finely chopped
1 large clove garlic, chopped fine
¼ inch ginger, chopped fine
1 green chili, finely chopped
¼ teaspoon cumin seeds
½ inch cinnamon
3 black peppercorns
1 clove
¾ tablespoons ginger-garlic paste
1 – 1½ heaped teaspoon red chili powder (I use MDH Deghi Mirch powder)
¼ teaspoon turmeric powder
¼ teaspoon coriander-cumin powder
¼ teaspoon garam masala powder
¼ teaspoon black pepper powder
½ teaspoon Parsi sambhar masala (optional)
Salt to taste
1 teaspoon sugar, or to taste (optional)
½ tablespoon cane vinegar, or to taste (optional)
2 large tomatoes, halve, grate the pulpy side, discard skin
½ + ¼ handful coriander leaves, chopped
3 - 4 mint leaves, chopped
2 - 3 tablespoons oil, or as desired

Method for Kheema:

1.    Wash the kheema in a colander or a sieve. Leave aside.



2.    Heat oil in a wok/kadhai. Add cumin seeds, cinnamon, black peppercorns, cloves and allow to splutter.



3.    Add green chilies, chopped ginger, chopped garlic and sauté for a few seconds.



4.    Add onions and continue frying until the onions turn golden brown.



5.    Add ginger-garlic paste, red chili powder, turmeric powder, coriander-cumin powder, garam masala powder, pepper powder, Parsi sambhar masala, half a teaspoon salt and sauté for a few seconds to roast the masala well (do not allow the spices to burn).



6.    Add the grated tomatoes and mix them well with the spice mixture.



7.    Allow the tomatoes to cook until it is rid of the raw tomato smell and oil separates.



8.    Add the first ½ handful of chopped coriander leaves and the mint leaves. Sauté for few seconds.



9.    Add the washed kheema and mix well into the spicy tomato mix.



10. Keep sautéing the kheema until all of it is nicely blended with the masala and the raw kheema loses it lumpy texture.



11. Add half a cup of water, lower the flame, cover the wok-kadhai and continue cooking.
12. Check to see if the kheema is cooked, and if done, continue cooking (uncovered) to dry up the left-over water content in the kheema.



13. Check seasoning (salt).
14. Add sugar and cane vinegar (if using). Give it a good stir and allow to cook for a minute. Check the balance of flavours and adjust sugar and vinegar, as suits your palate.
15. Continue cooking the kheema for a minute more.
16. Add in the second handful of chopped coriander leaves and stir fry the kheema until there is absolutely no water content in it. A fried, no-moisture kheema is the texture you are aiming for.



17. Once the texture is attained, remove kheema into a bowl, cool and put it in the fridge for an hour (or two). By the way, this quantity will give you around 300-310 grams of cooked kheema.

Ingredients for Mash Potatoes:

12 medium sized potatoes
Salt, to season the mash potatoes
Black pepper powder, to season the mash potatoes

Method for Mash Potatoes:

1.    Boil the potatoes in a pressure cooker for 2 whistles (or 3 whistles, max).
2.    Allow the steam to release by itself, open the cooker, remove the potatoes.
3.    Peel the potatoes and immediately use a ricer or a potato masher to mash each potato while it is piping hot. Continue the peeling, mashing process until all the potatoes are mashed to a smooth texture. Please ensure there are no lumps.



4.    Season with salt and pepper to taste.
5.    COVER with a cloth and leave aside until needed.

Ingredients to ‘build’ the Patties: 

Mash potatoes, divide into 24 portions (will make 12 patties)
Cooked Kheema, divide into 12 portions (approximately 25 grams each)
3 - 4 tablespoons oil, to grease your hands when preparing the patties
1 cup fine semolina (barik rawa/suji)
3 eggs, SEASONED and beaten to a light froth
Oil, to fry the patties


Method:

1.    Lightly dust a LARGE thali (or plate) with 1 to 1½ tablespoons semolina.



2.    In another smaller plate add the rest of the semolina.



3.    Oil/grease your palms with a bit of oil.



4.    Take one portion of the potato mash, roll into a smooth ball, flatten it in the palm of your hand and then shape it into a shallow scoop.



5.    Add one portion of the cooked kheema into the shallow scoop.



6.    With the other hand take another portion of potato, gently flatten it in the platter itself. Pick it up and carefully place it over the kheema-potato in your hand and gently pinch the edges of the potatoes so as to ENCASE the kheema within.
 


7.    Once the sides are sealed, gently smoothen out any cracks (if any) that have formed on the patties. (IMPORTANT: Smoothen out the cracks carefully and really well as that will ensure the patties do not break when you fry them – not a very good video but VIDEO ATTACHED, nevertheless)



8.    Carefully place the pattie in the plate of semolina.



9.    Sprinkle the semolina all over the pattie. Ensure the pattie is lightly but well covered with semolina.



10. Place the prepped semolina-coated pattie onto the large thali/plate that has a light dusting of semolina. (Note: We have lightly dusted this thali with semolina to ensure the prepped patties do not stick to the thali)



11. Follow point number 3 to 9 and repeat the pattie making process for the remaining 11 patties.



12. Heat a good quantity of oil in a non-stick pan. (good quantity and yet not as much as you would use to deep fry – these patties are NOT deep fried).



13. Take a prepped pattie, dip it in the beaten egg (egg wash).



14. Place it in the hot oil to fry. Repeat with as many patties as you can comfortably fit into the frying pan.



15. Fry the patties on one side until golden.
16. Flip the patties and fry the other side to a golden, as well.
17. Remove the patties when done and drain on paper towels.
18. Repeat the ‘egg-wash and fry’ process until all the patties are done.



Chef Notes:

1.    All caps are for emphasis. I do not pen to offend.
2.    Please fish out as much of the whole garam masala as you can before you begin making the patties.
3.    In case you don’t have Parsi sambhar masala in your pantry, you may increase the chili powder a wee bit. Parsi Sambhar masala is available online (Mangal Masalas) and this masala and many others are also couriered, pan India, by Katy Messman. The homemade ones by Katy are, of course, way better. I have them couriered to Pune all the way from Surat. Been doing so for years.
4.    Ideally, I make this kheema a day ahead and store it in the fridge. I remove the kheema from the fridge an hour before making the patties. You can also store this kheema in the fridge for 3 to 4 days. As it has no moisture in it, it keeps very nicely. I made these patties from a day old, cooked kheema that I had stored overnight, in the fridge.
5.    If you do not wish to grate the tomatoes, chopping them will work too. The same technique applies, though, cook until the tomatoes are mushy and don’t give off the raw smell and until oil separates. I would NOT RECOMMEND pureeing them in a mixer.
6.    The final consistency/texture of the kheema is a glistening, moisture-free version.
7.    The sugar and cane vinegar are optional. We Parsi’s prefer the kheema sweet, sour, and spicy. If you aren’t fond of the sweet and sour flavours, give these two ingredients a miss.
8.    Cane vinegar can be substituted with white or brown vinegar.
9.    When (and if) you add the sugar and vinegar, I suggest you add a little at a time. Add, cook for a few seconds to allow the flavours to meld, taste, adjust.
10. Ideally you will require 12 medium sized potatoes, but I would advise you boil 13, just in case a boiled potato turns out to be rotten from within. If they all turn out fine, sprinkle salt, pepper, and a pat of butter on the extra potato and chomp on it. Tastes lovely! 😉
11. Mash each potato as soon as you peel it, while it is HOT. Potatoes mash way quicker and smoother when hot.
12. There is yet another way to encase the kheema, but this is a simpler version. Using a large portion of potatoes and encasing the kheema by molding the potato mash around it is difficult for newbies who’ve never made patties. It was for this reason that I opted for this method.
13. Once you divide the mash potato into equal portions (use an ice cream scooper -you will get equal sized patties - secret's out! 😉) please work quickly to make the patties or keep the scoops of potatoes covered to ensure they do not go dry. Moulding them will get a tad difficult if the potato portions dry out.
14. You may share the direct blog-link of the recipe/s but do NOT publish my recipes, and/or my photographs, on any blogsite or website without my explicit consent or attempt to pass off my recipe/s as your own. You will be held accountable for plagiarism.

Some more photographs:






Dry Sauteed - Fried Kheema, straight off the stove and into this container

Use that scooper for even sized patties

Oil to grease your hands

A day old kheema, from the fridge. Taken out an hour before assembling the patties








Khatto Mittho Tikho Sali Kheemo – A (Tiny) Twist In The Tale – The Kheema Chronicles – 2



Yes, yes… we Parsi’s don’t say Qeema or Keema, we call it Kheema or Kheemo. Let’s not argue over this. *evil grin*

I cooked Kheema three ways. The previous recipe was Kheema Fry. I now take the Kheema Fry recipe a tad further to make Khatto Mittho Tikho Sali Kheemo; a typical Parsi recipe. Looks exactly the same as Kheema Fry, right? But flavour-wise, there is a marked difference. This recipe has an addition of two ingredients. Two ingredients that, when added, change the aroma and the flavour profile of the dish. We Parsi's love the combination of sweet, sour, and spicy flavours in certain dishes. This happens to be one of them. 😊

I will post individual recipes for each variation of kheema. That will lessen the confusion when it comes to searching for the recipes. The process photographs, at my blog, for all three recipes (base recipe), will be similar. I will not lie, I can be a tad lazy at times; I've used the same props (bowl, egg, bread) for both recipes. There will be extra process photographs and videos, though, for the third recipe that’s yet to be published. 

Ingredients:

1 kilo lamb kheema (goat or beef mince will also work)
6 onions, finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, chopped fine (optional)
1-inch ginger, chopped fine (optional)
3 green chilies, finely chopped
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
2 inches cinnamon
10 black peppercorns
3 cloves
3 tablespoons ginger-garlic paste
4-5 heaped teaspoons red chili powder (I use MDH Deghi Mirch powder)
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
1 teaspoon coriander-cumin powder
1 teaspoon garam masala powder
1 teaspoon black pepper powder
2 teaspoons Parsi sambhar masala (optional)
Salt to taste
3-4 teaspoons sugar, or to taste
2 tablespoons cane vinegar, or to taste
7 - 8 large tomatoes, halve, grate the pulpy side, discard skin
1 + 1 handful coriander leaves, chopped
10 - 15 mint leaves, chopped
8 – 10 tablespoons oil, or as desired
200-250 grams potato matchsticks/sali (I use store bought)

Method:

1.    Wash the kheema in a colander or a sieve. Leave aside.



2.    Heat oil in a large wok/kadhai. Add cumin seeds, cinnamon, black peppercorns, cloves and allow to splutter.



3.    Add green chilies, chopped ginger, chopped garlic and sauté for a few seconds.



4.    Add onions and continue frying until the onions turn golden brown.



5.    Add ginger-garlic paste, red chili powder, turmeric powder, coriander-cumin powder, garam masala powder, pepper powder, Parsi sambhar masala, a teaspoon salt and sauté for a few seconds to roast the masala well (do not allow the spices to burn).



6.    Add the grated tomatoes and mix them well with the spice mixture.



7.    Allow the tomatoes to cook until it is rid of the raw tomato smell and oil separates.



8.    Add the first handful of chopped coriander leaves and the mint leaves. Sauté for few seconds.



9.    Add the washed kheema and mix well into the spicy tomato mix.



10. Keep sautéing the kheema until all of it is nicely blended with the masala and the raw kheema loses it lumpy texture.



11. Add 1 – 1½ cups water, lower the flame, cover the wok-kadhai and continue cooking.
12. Check to see if the kheema is cooked, and if done, continue cooking (uncovered) to dry up the left-over water content in the kheema.



13. Check seasoning (salt).
14. Add sugar and cane vinegar. Give it a good stir and allow to cook for a minute. Check the balance of flavours and adjust sugar and vinegar, as suits your palate.
15. Continue cooking the kheema for a minute more.
16. Add in the second handful of chopped coriander leaves as garnish or give the kheema a mix.
17. To Serve: Remove kheema in a serving bowl, sprinkled with sali, and serve with a side of fried egg, thinly sliced onions, lime wedges and crisp butter-fried pau (small soft bread). Brun bread will work beautifully too.


To make Sali (potato matchsticks) from scratch (Sigh!)

Grate potatoes. Sprinkle salt over the grated potatoes, to season. Heat oil in a wok (or in a deep fryer that has a sieve/mesh). Fry the potato match-sticks and use a slotted straining spoon to remove match-sticks from the wok. Drain on paper towels.

Please note, no self-respecting, lazy-assed Parsi will ever make Sali from scratch. It’s way easier to walk down to a wafer shop and buy these crisp babies off the shelf. Sali, for all Bawas, is always store bought. I have penned the basic recipe of Sali, though, for the enthu-cutlets out there. *cheeky grin*



Chef Notes:

1.    If 1 kilo Kheema seems a bit much for your family, please feel free to halve the quantity of each ingredient and continue with the method as mentioned.
2.    If you are cooking this from scratch, instead of turning Kheema Fry to Khatto Mittho Tikho Kheemo, then the consistency of this kheema can be a semi-gravy base. You need not dry up the kheema completely. The semi-gravy base would allow the Sali to soak up the flavours and that tastes yum, too
3.    The finely chopped ginger and garlic is optional because I had this quantity peeled and ready from another dish that I’d been cooking, and I did not want it going waste. Feel free to omit it if you so wish.
4.    In case you omit the chopped ginger and garlic and if you doubt whether the ginger-garlic paste will suffice, feel free to add a teaspoon more. The flavour will not differ much. I promise!
5.    In case you don’t have Parsi Sambhar masala in your pantry, you may increase the chili powder a wee bit. Parsi Sambhar masala is available online (Mangal Masalas) and this masala and many others are also couriered, pan India, by Katy Messman. The homemade ones by Katy are, of course, way better. I have them couriered to Pune all the way from Surat. Been doing so for years. NO, you cannot use South Indian Sambar. Both are very different masalas. 
6.    Please adjust the quantity of oil according to your dietary preference. Mine’s high calorific and I’m so not ashamed of it. 😝
7.    If you do not wish to grate the tomatoes, chopping them will work too. The same technique applies, though, cook until the tomatoes are mushy and don’t give off the raw smell and until oil separates. If you don’t mind a slightly moist kheema, you may puree them in a mixer, if you so wish.
8.    The final consistency/texture of the kheema is entirely up to you. Sauté it to a dry texture (I did) or if you prefer it a tad moist, sauté it for a shorter duration. If you prefer it with a thick-ish gravy, to sop up with bread, that will surely work too. There is no right or wrong here. The final texture that feels right to you, is the right texture. 😊
9.    Cane vinegar can be substituted with white or brown vinegar. The aroma of cane vinegar, though, is amazing.
10. When you add the sugar and vinegar, I suggest you add a little at a time. Add, cook for a few seconds to allow the flavours to meld, then taste and adjust. I have mentioned the quantity as used by me but please allow your taste buds and palate to guide you. It should be to your taste.
11. You can also use the same recipe to make Kheema Par Edu. Yeah, we parsi’s love our ‘par edu’ dishes. 😊 Lay out piping hot Khatto Mittho Tikho Kheemo in a pan and break whole eggs over it. You may also pour whipped (seasoned, of course) eggs over the kheema. Yum stuff, this. 😊
12. You may share the direct blog-link of the recipe/s but do NOT publish my recipes, and/or my photographs, on any blogsite or website without my explicit consent or attempt to pass off my recipe/s as your own. You will be held accountable for plagiarism.

Some more photographs:










This photograph is courtesy the World Wide Web and Kolah's FB page